Hi, My name is Douglas Turek. You can call me Doug. I'm a witty, somewhat scruffy bookseller and happily married husband and father. I write science fiction and fantasy and poetry, some of which will show up here. Feel free to drop me a line at my first name Douglas, followed by an R, then Turek, add in the pleasing at sign, gmail, then the ubiquitous 'com'.
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Here's my flavors.me page.
What I've liked
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Reblogged from joeyskingdom  188,369 notes

tamirthegreat:

therighthandofdoomcpn:

boxwithlid:

livid-righteousness-badgers:

justdaps:

nahchillhomebro:

summonermedirby:

I don’t think people give Flash enough credit.

…………….my goodness

He didn’t just rebuild an apartment building.

HE FUCKING LEARNED HOW TO BUILD AN APARTMENT BUILDING. HE DID FUCKING RESEARCH. IT TAKES SEVERAL GODDAMN YEARS TO LEARN ALL THE ENGINEERING AND LEGAL CONSTRAINTS OF BUILDING A FUCKING BUILDING AND JUST DID IT.

This is one of my favorite flash comics. It really highlights how the flash doesn’t just run really fast, but can do absolutely astounding things. I remember reading this for the first time and having my head explode. 

Flash rules.

Flash is actually really freaking awesome.

to quote Hal Jordan: “the fastest man alive was always late because he stopped to befriend the people he saved”

Barry Allen is a sweetheart

Barry Allen is great….but it may not be up to code.

(via Daniel Pinkwater’s brilliant, hilarious, life-changing books as $3 ebooks - Boing Boing)   Of all of these, I highly recommend both Fat Men From Space (which will comfortably be read by most adults in an hour or less and describes the ravaging of Earth’s fast food, sugary snacks, and fat-laden delights by bespectacled, plaid suit wearing fat men from space) and The Last Guru, which offers an alternative interpretation of enlightenment and spirituality which profoundly affected my young mind by suggesting ever so artfully and gently that there was nothing wrong with me after all.  I am excited for these.  He’s still my favorite author of all time.

(via Daniel Pinkwater’s brilliant, hilarious, life-changing books as $3 ebooks - Boing Boing) Of all of these, I highly recommend both Fat Men From Space (which will comfortably be read by most adults in an hour or less and describes the ravaging of Earth’s fast food, sugary snacks, and fat-laden delights by bespectacled, plaid suit wearing fat men from space) and The Last Guru, which offers an alternative interpretation of enlightenment and spirituality which profoundly affected my young mind by suggesting ever so artfully and gently that there was nothing wrong with me after all. I am excited for these. He’s still my favorite author of all time.

Reblogged from rationalinterestlevel  97 notes

In a 2013 study, researchers found that children ages 3 to 5 whose parents read to them from an electronic book had lower reading comprehension than children whose parents used traditional books. Part of the reason, they said, was that parents and children using an electronic device spent more time focusing on the device itself than on the story (a conclusion shared by at least two other studies). “Parents were literally putting their hands over the kids’ hands and saying, ‘Wait, don’t press the button yet. Finish this up first,’ ” said Dr. Julia Parish-Morris, a developmental psychologist at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the lead author of the 2013 study that was conducted at Temple University. Parents who used conventional books were more likely to engage in what education researchers call “dialogic reading,” the sort of back-and-forth discussion of the story and its relation to the child’s life that research has shown are key to a child’s linguistic development. By Is E-Reading to Your Toddler Story Time, or Simply Screen Time? - NYTimes.com (via infoneer-pulse)

Reblogged from snafuzzy  241,793 notes

aliilovely:

leviathans-in-the-tardis:

you don’t realise how much tumblr has changed your view on things until you spend time with friends who don’t have tumblr and they say something and you’re just like

oh

This

My reaction, too.  I have been exposed to a variety of viewpoints on Tumblr, people from around the world and around my country who take the time to not merely espouse certain views or beliefs they have but to explain them and offer forth knowledge of their own life and experience.  It’s been richly rewarding.  It’s nice when I meet, in any part of my life, someone, anyone, and feel like I can show them a bit more respect and understanding.  I’m not saying I’m an initiate into the experiential aspect of other peoples’ lives, but just that I can try harder to understand because I’ve gotten some great pointers from a variety of people..  I really like my Tumblr friends.  I think you folks are beautiful and special and expressive and you’ve educated me through a series of rants, essays, confessions, curmudgeonly grunts, gifsets, tags, photos of the people and things you love, the occasional raw laying bare of your soul, your vulnerable side,  your drunken posts, your posts that you delete the next morning, and your occasional questions (always welcome), condolences, pats on the back, fan mail, and other interactions.  

When I was in high school, I sat at the table in the cafeteria that became home to the nerds, weirdoes, punks, burnouts, stoners, and other square pegs.  I get a similar sense here.  We’re the cool kids, you should sit at our table.  You’ll fit right in.